Cold anyone help me with the usage of the particle も?

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Thread created by bagibso1 on Thursday the 24th of November 2016 at 3:52 AM
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From what I understand, the particle  can be used as also/too, either/or, and neither/nor. I'm not sure how exactly you would plug that into a sentence. I've seen it used twice in the the same sentence or just  attatched to an additional subject as a semtence all on it's own. Could anyone give me the rundown on its function and grammatical placement? Below is what I think it may be used like:

(わたし)学校 (がゝこう)が好(す)きです。ゆみさん

watashi wa gakkou ga suki desu. yumi-san mo.

(I like school. So does Yumi.)

 

I've asked my teacher and classmates to explain, but my teacher's English isn't quite up to the task to explain it well and the other students are having the same confusion I am.

Thanks in advance!

じゃ、また。

#1 Posted by bagibso1 on Thursday the 24th of November 2016 at 3:52 AM
Member Since
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1 are you using Genki?

2 why would you learn japanese from a person that does not speak proper english? School standards seem to be pretty high in japan, for someone who chooses to teach japanese to english people there should be no excuse for not being proficient enough.

#2 Posted by Adachi on Sunday the 27th of November 2016 at 11:33 PM
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No, I'm not using Genki (I've been trying to get my hands on a copy though). I use the school-provided textbook "Adventures in Japanese" along with Mango Languages and other online sites. As for my teacher, her english is pretty amazing and she very rarely blanks out on how to explain something to us. It's sort of like when English speakers try to explain the definition of "the" to non-English speakers. It's very hard and one of those things that we just kind of know and never had to think about. The particle  happens to be like that for her. Please don't insult my teacher, especially if you aren't going to provide me with any information to help me understand the thing I asked about.

じゃ、また。

#3 Posted by bagibso1 on Tuesday the 29th of November 2016 at 3:05 AM
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8 Dec, 2016
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I do not think that a person who can not explain the should be allowed to teach english.

I think it should be a crime, that person is stealing valuable time that could be used for the benefit for society, or to learn english proper.

The most valuable we have is time, but nothing is as much neglected by law and society. 

Now that you have pointed it out, mo is just as basic. Instead of her learning it the right way, all of her students have to waste time looking it up. Even though i do not understand your problem, it just copies was what said earlier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#4 Posted by Hideki on Thursday the 8th of December 2016 at 12:29 AM, last modified at 12:31 AM
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17 Dec, 2016
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From what I gather, the gramatical structure in Japanese is nothing like English so it cant really be compared to anything in English.  I have to say I've had a bit of an easier time understanding Japanese grammar because when I translate the sentances that I study, I translate it into my native language 1st and then from there to English which helps me a lot.

From the example you gave, the function of も I see is used as "as well".  ("I like school. Yumi-san does as well.")

I wonder if that explanation helps a little ^

Since I only started studying Japanese about a week ago, I'd very much appreciate corrections if I'm wrong.

#5 Posted by Cookie Monster on Friday the 23rd of December 2016 at 2:56 PM
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"も" is applied and used in the same way as "well" can be used in English: by using the context. Have you noticed how in English, "well" can mean different things based on the context?

Examples;

"WELL, I'm leaving now."

Well - 'This was good, but-'

"Yumi as WELL."

Well - 'too'

も can be used as "also/too", but only if the context (the rest of the phrase/sentence) would make sense to go along with it. One would NOT think you meant "Yumi neither" since it would not make sense to say "I like school, she neither".

When you said "I like school", followed by someone's name, someone would naturally think you mean "mo" as in too, since it makes more sense because you're not adding another verb to contrast your 'likes' with her 'dislikes'.

#6 Posted by Hanji Zoe on Thursday the 5th of January 2017 at 6:36 PM, last modified on Friday the 6th of January 2017 at 3:01 PM
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Like with "well" in English. Someone would say "Well, I'm leaving" as "This has been good, but-" instead of "Too, I'm leaving." It makes more sense. But keep in mind that it's also because native Japanese speakers only use "mo" in specific phrases or sentences. (Like using "well" in front of sentences; it's a common style of talking). So if it were used differently (asides from what is commonly used with/for), then the meaning would be changed in their minds to accommodate/make sense of the context around that particle. And here's 2 reasons why they wouldn't think you meant "either/or, neither/nor"; 1)There are more commonly used synonyms and ways to say "but she doesn't" or "not". 2) (If speaking verbally) Tone of how you say the sentence. (One would say it a little more offended or matter of factly if saying "I like it, but she doesn't")
#7 Posted by Hanji Zoe on Thursday the 5th of January 2017 at 6:37 PM
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Sorry for the formatting. I'm on a mobile and the site does not allow me to add line-long spaces between sentences. And my apologies if it doesn't make sense (it's how I learned to make sense of it).
#8 Posted by Hanji Zoe on Thursday the 5th of January 2017 at 6:39 PM, last modified at 6:40 PM

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